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TFB - Daily News Summary - Apr 9, 2018

Monday, April 9, 2018  

THE FLORIDA BAR

Daily News Summary

An electronic digest of media coverage of interest to members of The Florida Bar compiled each workday by the Public Information and Bar Services Department and distributed to the Board of Governors, section and committee chairs, voluntary bar presidents, members of the judiciary and others.

 

April 9, 2018

 

Legal Profession

DUVAL COURTHOUSE TO TRANSFORM FOR GUARDIAN AD LITEM OZ EVENT; VOLUNTEERS ADVOCATE FOR CHILDREN

Florida Times-Union | Article | April 06, 2018

For more than 30 years, the guardian ad litem program has served as the region’s exclusive advocate for children in dependency court. More than 1,150 children in the Fourth Judicial Circuit are assigned to 565 certified guardians ad litem; it costs about $3,000 to train a single guardian ad litem. Dozens of law firms, businesses and individual donors are coming together to transform three floors of the Duval County Courthouse into the Magical Wizard of Oz’s Emerald City to host a fundraising event. The event, scheduled for April 13, will try to bring in at least $100,000 for the Guardian ad Litem Foundation of Florida’s First Coast.

ALSO READ:

‘THERE’S NO PLACE LIKE HOME’ THEME OF GUARDIAN AD LITEM FOUNDATION BENEFIT

Jacksonville Daily Record | Article | April 06, 2018

 

Judiciary

ALISSA MCKEE ELLISON APPOINTED TO HILLSBOROUGH BENCH

Florida Politics | Article | April 06, 2018

Gov. Rick Scott appointed Alissa McKee Ellison to the Hillsborough County Court on Friday [April 6]. Ellison, a shareholder at GrayRobinson, will replace former Hillsborough Judge Michael S. Williams, who was selected by Scott last year to serve on the Thirteenth Judicial Circuit Court.

ALSO READ:

RICK SCOTT REAPPOINTS 6 COMPENSATION CLAIMS JUDGES

Florida Politics | Article | April 09, 2018

 

Judiciary

IN MIAMI-DADE, SUCCESSES IN THE BATTLE AGAINST MENTAL ILLNESS

Northwest Florida Daily News | Article | April 07, 2018

Steve Leifman, a circuit court judge in Miami-Dade County, is the person most often credited for introducing the mental health diversion program concept to Florida. Much of what Leifman has done for South Florida, he’s accomplished without significant help from the state. As Okaloosa County officials seeking to fund a local mental health pilot program have learned, the state’s executive and legislative branches have tended to shy away from appropriating funds for innovative mental health projects. Today, Miami-Dade — long renowned for having the largest population of mentally ill residents in the country — has initiated a full-scale effort to cater to the many diverse needs of those with mental health illnesses.

 

Civil Justice Issues

MARCIA GREEN AND CHRISTINE LARSON: FORTY YEARS OF CIVIL LEGAL AID

Gainesville Sun | Column | April 08, 2018

Marcia Green, pro bono coordinator, and Christine Larson, executive director of Three Rivers Legal Services, write: “In 2018, Three Rivers Legal Services celebrates its 40th anniversary of providing free, civil legal services to North Florida’s low-income and vulnerable populations. . . . Under our current leadership, Three Rivers is funded by over 30 grants, with a staff of 20 attorneys, four paralegals, nine support staff and a small administrative team. We are fortunate to have numerous volunteer attorneys and law students help with accomplishing our mission.”

 

Civil Justice Issues

FLORIDA SUPREME COURT WILL HEAR CASE ON ORANGE COUNTY’S NONPARTISAN ELECTIONS

Civil Justice Issues | Article | April 06, 2018

The Florida Supreme Court on Friday [April 6] agreed to take up a legal battle about a voter-approved change that called for Orange County constitutional officers to be chosen in nonpartisan elections. Orange County voters in 2014 supported revamping the county charter to include non-partisan elections for the clerk of circuit court, comptroller, property appraiser, sheriff, supervisor of elections and tax collector. Constitutional officers filed a lawsuit, and a circuit judge rejected the change, concluding that the issue was “preempted” to the Legislature.

 

Legal Profession

LEGAL AID ISSUES THUNDERDOME AWARDS TO VOLUNTEER LAWYERS ON 50TH ANNIVERSARY

Tallahassee Democrat | Article | April 09, 2018

The Legal Aid Foundation of Tallahassee celebrated its 50th anniversary on March 29 by announcing the recipients of the fourth annual Thunderdome Tallahassee Awards. The awards recognize an outstanding participant and mentor of Thunderdome Tallahassee Class 4. Launched in September 2014, Thunderdome Tallahassee addresses a need for equal access to justice by providing family law training, mentorship, leadership development and recognition to volunteer lawyers serving families and children.

 

Criminal Justice Issues

COPS, LAWYERS SAY QUESTIONS REMAIN ABOUT HOW TO USE FLORIDA’S ‘RED FLAG’ GUN LAW

Orlando Sentinel | Article | April 06, 2018

Within weeks of the Parkland school shooting that claimed 17 lives, a South Florida judge used a new law – the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School Public Safety Act – to grant the state’s first “risk protection order,” allowing police officers to temporarily seize guns and ammunition from a 56-year-old man who was deemed to be a threat. But law enforcement agencies and legal professionals are still scrambling to address the challenges of the so-called “red flag” law — developing consistent protocols and procedures to serve the orders, getting appropriate training and interpreting terms not explicitly defined in the law.

 

Judiciary

BAR SURVEY RENDERS JUDGMENT ON VOLUSIA JUDGES

Daytona Beach News-Journal | Article | April 07, 2018

The Volusia Bar on Tuesday [April 3] released the results of a judicial survey it emailed to 974 attorneys in the county. Of those, 219 – 22 percent of the attorneys – responded. Attorneys were asked to rate whether the judges were excellent, acceptable, need improvement or no opinion in the following areas: Knowledge and application of law, impartiality, diligence and preparedness, punctuality of court proceedings and rulings, case management and judicial demeanor, courtroom control and enforcement of professional standards.

 

Civil Justice Issues

NEW LAW SCOTT SIGNED MAKES PUBLIC ACCESS TO BEACHES HARDER TO ESTABLISH

Tampa Bay Times | Article | April 05, 2018

A bill that Gov. Rick Scott signed into law last month has sent shock waves through Florida’s waterfront communities and prompted questions from confused beach residents and businesses. Experts say the law’s effect on beach access is not quite as dire as some people fear. The bill blocks local governments from adopting ordinances to allow continued public entry to privately owned beaches even when property owners may want to block off their land. Instead, any city or county that wants to do that has to get a judge’s approval first — by suing the private landowners.  Sen. Kathleen Passidomo, R-Naples, who sponsored the bill, said the law simply codifies a process that allows ordinances to be passed with less controversy, by getting a judge’s ruling up front.

 


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